Johns Hopkins Researchers Say ‘Magic’ Mushrooms Should Be Decriminalized

(ANTIMEDIA— Researchers from Johns Hopkins University recommended this week that psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, be removed from the federal government’s list of Schedule 1 drugs, which are allegedly the most dangerous.

According to an analysis published by researchers at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, “psilocybin can provide therapeutic benefits that may support the development of an approvable New Drug Application.” Mounting evidence suggests mushrooms can help treat depression. Johns Hopkins has been at the forefront of research into the potential therapeutic effects of psychedelic mushrooms, and the researchers believe its low potential for abuse could warrant a rescheduling.

According to their report in the Journal of Neuropharmacology,

There is no clear evidence of physical dependence and withdrawal in preclinical or clinical studies, or among those who chronically used illicit products.”

As The Hub, Johns Hopkins news publication explained:

Studies in animals and humans both show low potential for abuse, the researchers say. When rats push a lever to receive psilocybin, they don’t keep pushing the lever like they do for drugs such as cocaine, alcohol, or heroin. When it comes to human studies, people who have used psilocybin typically report using it a few times across their lifetime.

Though the researchers caution that more research is needed and that psilocybin still poses risks, those risks are far lower than other drugs, and there is no known “overdose” amount. According to Matthew Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry and behavior studies and co-author of the analysis:

We should be clear that psilocybin is not without risks of harm, which are greater in recreational than medical settings, but relatively speaking, looking at other drugs both legal and illegal, it comes off as being the least harmful in different surveys and across different countries.”

In order for psilocybin to be rescheduled, Phase III clinical trials would have to be completed. If it were to be rescheduled, it would be in the same category as prescription sleep aids and benzodiazepines.

Creative Commons / Anti-Media / Report a typo

Since you’re here…

…We have a small favor to ask. Fewer and fewer people are seeing Anti-Media articles as social media sites crack down on us, and advertising revenues across the board are quickly declining. However, unlike many news organizations, we haven’t put up a paywall because we value open and accessible journalism over profit — but at this point, we’re barely even breaking even. Hopefully, you can see why we need to ask for your help. Anti-Media’s independent journalism and analysis takes substantial time, resources, and effort to produce, but we do it because we believe in our message and hope you do, too.

If everyone who reads our reporting and finds value in it helps fund it, our future can be much more secure. For as little as $1 and a minute of your time, you can support Anti-Media. Thank you. Click here to support us

    5

COMMENTS

0

You must be logged in to post a comment.