Neil Young Debuts Song From Monsanto-Themed Album Criticizing Starbucks

SM Gibson
May 22, 2015

(ANTIMEDIA) Legendary songwriter, Neil Young, debuted a new song this week entitled Rock Starbucks. The track will be featured on Young’s highly anticipated soon to be released album aptly named The Monsanto Years.

On Thursday, Democracy Now aired an excerpt for the music video to Rock Starbucks. In the clip, Young sings “I want a cup of coffee, but I don’t want a GMO. I love to start my day off without helping Monsanto.

The former Buffalo Springfield guitarist has been notoriously vocal about his abhorrence with Monsanto and Starbucks in the past. Young publicly stated late last year that he was was boycotting Starbucks because, according to Young, “Starbucks doesn’t think you have the right to know what’s in your coffee. So it’s teamed up with Monsanto to sue the small U.S. state of Vermont to stop you from finding out.”

Neil Young, who will be collaborating with two of Willie Nelson’s sons, Lukas and Micah, on The Monsanto Years, offered the pair an opportunity to work together this past December. “He was like, ‘Hey, I wrote a bunch of new songs,” says Micah. “I want you guys to come do the record with me. Love, Neil.” They were amazed at the email. “I was so stoked,” says Lukas. “I can’t even describe how elated I was.” 

The collective work is a concept album that will focus completely on the crimes and abuses by Monsanto. The Monsanto Years is scheduled to be released on June 16.

You can listen to an excerpt of Rock Starbucks below:


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